THE EDUCATIONAL TYRANNY OF THE NEUROTYPICALS

October 16th, 2018 - By Melisa in Autism Spectrum, Uncategorized

“Neurotypical” is a term used by the autism community to describe what society refers to as “normal.” According to the Centers for Disease Control, one in 59 children, and one in 34 boys, are on the autism spectrum—in other words, neuroatypical. That’s 3 percent of the male population. If you add ADHD—attention deficit hyperactivity disorder—and dyslexia, roughly one out of four people are not “neurotypicals.” … Continue reading

Teens Sleeping Too Much, Or Not Enough? Parents Can Help

September 24th, 2018 - By Melisa in Sleep, Teens

The average American teenager gets seven hours of sleep a night, wedging it in between homework, outside activities, dinner and maybe a job. But research suggests teens need more like nine hours…Unfortunately, even their bodies work against them, says Mary Carskadon, a longtime sleep researcher and professor of psychiatry and human behavior at Brown University. As children grow into the middle and teen years, they … Continue reading

Yes, teens are texting and using social media instead of reading books, researchers say

August 27th, 2018 - By Melisa in Teens

A new study has alarming findings, but is probably not surprising to anyone who knows a teenager: High-schoolers today are texting, scrolling and using social media instead of reading books and magazines…In their free time, American adolescents are cradling their devices hours each day rather than losing themselves in print or long-form media, according to research published Monday by the American Psychological Association. Read full … Continue reading

I Learned I Have Sleep Apnea. It’s More Serious Than Many People Realize.

July 30th, 2018 - By Melisa in Sleep

Sleep apnea can be downright deadly, and not just for those who have it. It’s associated with a greater risk of depression, heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular conditions, as well as insulin resistance. As I learned, there’s no reason to meekly accept sleep apnea: There are many treatment options that can control it. Read full article: The New York Times, “I Learned I Have … Continue reading

‘Cutting Edge’ Program For Children With Autism And ADHD Rests On Razor-Thin Evidence

July 17th, 2018 - By Melisa in Autism Spectrum, Information on ADD/ADHD

Brain Balance says its nonmedical and drug-free program helps children who struggle with ADHD, autism spectrum disorders and learning and processing disorders. The company says it addresses a child’s challenges with a combination of physical exercises, nutritional guidance and academic training. An NPR investigation of Brain Balance reveals a company whose promises have resonated with parents averse to medication. But Brain Balance also appears to … Continue reading

A Map That Shows You Everything Wrong With Your Brain

July 9th, 2018 - By Melisa in neuroAgility News, Neurofeedback News

Kerson placed the cap on my head and clipped two sensors on to my earlobes, areas of no electrical activity, to act as baselines. As she began Electrogelling the 19 spots on my head that aligned with the cap’s electrodes, I was nervous in two different directions: one, that my brain would be revealed as suboptimal, underfunctioning, deficient. The other, that it would be fine, … Continue reading

Association of Food Allergy and Other Allergic Conditions With Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children

June 12th, 2018 - By Melisa in Autism Spectrum

Question  What are the associations of food allergy and other allergic conditions with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children? Findings  This cross-sectional study used nationally representative data from 199 520 children aged 3 to 17 years who participated in the US National Health Interview Survey from 1997 to 2016. Children with food, respiratory, and skin allergies were significantly more likely to have ASD than children without … Continue reading

Music Lessons Improve Children’s Cognitive Skills, Academic Performance

May 10th, 2018 - By Melisa in Athletic/Performance Enhancement, Uncategorized

Structured music lessons significantly enhance children’s cognitive abilities, including language-based reasoning, short-term memory, planning and inhibition, which lead to improved academic performance. Published in Frontiers in Neuroscience, the research is the first large-scale, longitudinal study to be adapted into the regular school curriculum. Visual arts lessons were also found to significantly improve children’s visual and spatial memory. Read full article: Laboratory Equipment, “Music Lessons Improve … Continue reading

Helping Kids With A.D.H.D., and Their Families, Thrive

April 26th, 2018 - By Melisa in Information on ADD/ADHD

When a child has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, it affects everybody in the family, said Dr. Mark Bertin, a developmental pediatrician in Pleasantville, N.Y. Parents need to understand the nature of A.D.H.D., he said, and appreciate that it affects “a host of self-management skills,” which play out in school but also in daily home routines. Read full article: The New York Times, “Helping Kids With … Continue reading

Why Teenagers Become ‘Allergic’ to Their Parents

April 19th, 2018 - By Melisa in Teens

The arrival of spring is often prime time for hay fever, but adolescents seem to be able to develop an allergy to their parents, either intermittent or chronic, at any time of the year. This allergy usually has a sudden onset around age 13 and can last for months or, in some cases, years. While it’s no fun to become the parent who cannot order … Continue reading