Cutting Edge’ Program For Children With Autism And ADHD Rests On Razor-Thin Evidence

July 17th, 2018 - By jen in Autism Spectrum, Information on ADD/ADHD

Brain Balance says its nonmed­ical and drug-free program helps chil­dren who struggle with ADHD, autism spec­trum disor­ders and learning and processing disor­ders. The company says it addresses a child’s chal­lenges with a combi­na­tion of phys­ical exer­cises, nutri­tional guid­ance and acad­emic training. An NPR inves­ti­ga­tion of Brain Balance reveals a company whose promises have resonated with parents averse to medica­tion. But Brain Balance also appears to … Continue reading

A Map That Shows You Everything Wrong With Your Brain

July 9th, 2018 - By jen in neuroAgility News, Neurofeedback News

Kerson placed the cap on my head and clipped two sensors on to my earlobes, areas of no elec­trical activity, to act as base­lines. As she began Elec­tro­gelling the 19 spots on my head that aligned with the cap’s elec­trodes, I was nervous in two different direc­tions: one, that my brain would be revealed as subop­timal, under­func­tioning, defi­cient. The other, that it would be fine, … Continue reading

Traveling” Brain Waves May Be Critical for Cognition

July 3rd, 2018 - By jen in Uncategorized

The elec­trical oscil­la­tions we call brain waves have intrigued scien­tists and the public for more than a century. But their function—and even whether they have one, rather than just reflecting brain activity like an engine’s hum—is still debated. Many neuro­sci­en­tists have assumed that if brain waves do anything, it is by oscil­lating in synchrony in different loca­tions. Yet a growing body of research suggests many … Continue reading

4 simple exercises to strengthen your attention and reduce distractibility

June 25th, 2018 - By jen in Uncategorized

Our atten­tion gets hijacked by every­thing from the stress in our lives to the ding of our phones. Neuro­sci­en­tist Amishi Jha shows how we can culti­vate the ability to focus on what really matters. “I think, there­fore I am distracted.” Read full article: TEDEd Lessons Worth Sharing, “4 simple exer­cises to strengthen your atten­tion and reduce distractibility.”    

What to Do When a Loved One Is Severely Depressed

June 18th, 2018 - By jen in Uncategorized

Mental illness is nothing to be ashamed of…But deep in the comment threads, some have also been debating a more uncom­fort­able ques­tion: What do you do when a friend is depressed for such a long time that you’ve started to feel that that nothing you can do will make a differ­ence, and your empathy reserves are tapped out? There are no easy answers. Read full … Continue reading

Association of Food Allergy and Other Allergic Conditions With Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children

June 12th, 2018 - By jen in Autism Spectrum

Ques­tion  What are the asso­ci­a­tions of food allergy and other allergic condi­tions with autism spec­trum disorder (ASD) in chil­dren? Find­ings  This cross-sectional study used nation­ally repre­sen­ta­tive data from 199 520 chil­dren aged 3 to 17 years who partic­i­pated in the US National Health Inter­view Survey from 1997 to 2016. Chil­dren with food, respi­ra­tory, and skin aller­gies were signif­i­cantly more likely to have ASD than chil­dren without … Continue reading

Music Lessons Improve Children’s Cognitive Skills, Academic Performance

May 10th, 2018 - By jen in Athletic/Performance Enhancement, Uncategorized

Struc­tured music lessons signif­i­cantly enhance children’s cogni­tive abil­i­ties, including language-based reasoning, short-term memory, plan­ning and inhi­bi­tion, which lead to improved acad­emic perfor­mance. Published in Fron­tiers in Neuro­science, the research is the first large-scale, longi­tu­dinal study to be adapted into the regular school curriculum. Visual arts lessons were also found to signif­i­cantly improve children’s visual and spatial memory. Read full article: Labo­ra­tory Equip­ment, “Music Lessons Improve … Continue reading

Helping Kids With A.D.H.D., and Their Families, Thrive

April 26th, 2018 - By jen in Information on ADD/ADHD

When a child has atten­tion deficit hyper­ac­tivity disorder, it affects every­body in the family, said Dr. Mark Bertin, a devel­op­mental pedi­a­tri­cian in Pleas­antville, N.Y. Parents need to under­stand the nature of A.D.H.D., he said, and appre­ciate that it affects “a host of self-manage­­ment skills,” which play out in school but also in daily home routines. Read full article: The New York Times, “Helping Kids With … Continue reading

Why Teenagers Become ‘Allergic’ to Their Parents

April 19th, 2018 - By jen in Teens

The arrival of spring is often prime time for hay fever, but adoles­cents seem to be able to develop an allergy to their parents, either inter­mit­tent or chronic, at any time of the year. This allergy usually has a sudden onset around age 13 and can last for months or, in some cases, years. While it’s no fun to become the parent who cannot order … Continue reading

The compelling case for working a lot less

April 9th, 2018 - By jen in Uncategorized

Researchers are learning that it doesn’t just mean that the work we produce at the end of a 14-hour day is of worse quality than when we’re fresh. This pattern of working also under­mines our creativity and our cogni­tion. Over time, it can make us feel phys­i­cally sick – and even, iron­i­cally, as if we have no purpose. Read full article: BBC, “The compelling case … Continue reading