Music Lessons Improve Children’s Cognitive Skills, Academic Performance

May 10th, 2018 - By jen in Athletic/Performance Enhancement, Uncategorized

Struc­tured music lessons signif­i­cantly enhance children’s cogni­tive abil­i­ties, including language-based reasoning, short-term memory, plan­ning and inhi­bi­tion, which lead to improved acad­emic perfor­mance. Published in Fron­tiers in Neuro­science, the research is the first large-scale, longi­tu­dinal study to be adapted into the regular school curriculum. Visual arts lessons were also found to signif­i­cantly improve children’s visual and spatial memory. Read full article: Labo­ra­tory Equip­ment, “Music Lessons Improve … Continue reading

Helping Kids With A.D.H.D., and Their Families, Thrive

April 26th, 2018 - By jen in Information on ADD/ADHD

When a child has atten­tion deficit hyper­ac­tivity disorder, it affects every­body in the family, said Dr. Mark Bertin, a devel­op­mental pedi­a­tri­cian in Pleas­antville, N.Y. Parents need to under­stand the nature of A.D.H.D., he said, and appre­ciate that it affects “a host of self-manage­­ment skills,” which play out in school but also in daily home routines. Read full article: The New York Times, “Helping Kids With … Continue reading

Why Teenagers Become ‘Allergic’ to Their Parents

April 19th, 2018 - By jen in Teens

The arrival of spring is often prime time for hay fever, but adoles­cents seem to be able to develop an allergy to their parents, either inter­mit­tent or chronic, at any time of the year. This allergy usually has a sudden onset around age 13 and can last for months or, in some cases, years. While it’s no fun to become the parent who cannot order … Continue reading

The compelling case for working a lot less

April 9th, 2018 - By jen in Uncategorized

Researchers are learning that it doesn’t just mean that the work we produce at the end of a 14-hour day is of worse quality than when we’re fresh. This pattern of working also under­mines our creativity and our cogni­tion. Over time, it can make us feel phys­i­cally sick – and even, iron­i­cally, as if we have no purpose. Read full article: BBC, “The compelling case … Continue reading

Poor grades tied to class times that don’t match our biological clocks

April 2nd, 2018 - By jen in Uncategorized

It may be time to tailor students’ class sched­ules to their natural biolog­ical rhythms, according to a new study from UC Berkeley and North­eastern Illi­nois Univer­sity.  Researchers tracked the personal daily online activity profiles of nearly 15,000 college students as they logged into campus servers. After sorting the students into “night owls,” “daytime finches” and “morning larks” — based on their activ­i­ties on days they … Continue reading

Want to enjoy the deep, mystical sleep of our ancestors? Turn your lights off at dusk.

March 8th, 2018 - By jen in neuroAgility News, Sleep

What if you could medi­tate like a Tibetan lama with no instruc­tion what­so­ever — and without having to subscribe to any reli­gious beliefs?  People hear a ques­tion like that and, unless they are partic­u­larly gullible, they assume they’re about to be scammed. But in this case there is nothing to buy — no tapes, no app, no reli­gious agenda that gets sprung on you at … Continue reading

UMass Medical School Creates First Division of Mindfulness

February 24th, 2018 - By jen in Uncategorized

As the bar for research on mind­ful­ness raises dramat­i­cally, a big change at the Univer­sity of Mass­a­chu­setts unites top-tier minds with increased resources to study meditation’s ther­a­peutic poten­tial. Read full article: mindful:healthy mind, healthy life, “UMass Medical School Creates First Divi­sion of Mind­ful­ness.”

Smartphone Detox: How To Power Down In A Wired World

February 16th, 2018 - By jen in Uncategorized

A growing number of doctors and psychol­o­gists are concerned about our rela­tion­ship with the phone. There’s a debate about what to call the problem. Some say “disorder” or “prob­lem­atic behavior.” Others think over-reliance on a smart­phone can become a behav­ioral addic­tion, like gambling. Read full article: npr, “Smart­phone Detox: How to Power Down In A Wired World.”

Learn How to Do Nothing With the Dutch Concept of Niksen

January 26th, 2018 - By jen in Anxiety, Neurofeedback News, Uncategorized

Instead of constantly occu­pying your mind with what you need to do next or bouncing from one task to another, niksen is the prac­tice of slowing it all down. As Mecking writes, it’s a welcome reprieve from soci­etal expec­ta­tions about work and produc­tivity that perme­ates the culture. Read full article: life­hacker, “Learn How to Do Nothing With the Dutch Concept of Niksen.”

10 Alternative Therapies for ADD & ADHD

January 16th, 2018 - By jen in Information on ADD/ADHD

Faced with the dilemma of poten­tial misdi­ag­nosis, conven­tional drug side effects, and a high rate of conven­tional treat­ment failure, I’m going to venture that it’s logical to seek out alter­na­tive ADHD ther­a­pies and basic lifestyle strate­gies that can either comple­ment or, in some cases, replace those prescribed by the doctor. Let’s look at a few of the more popular or emerging recom­men­da­tions.  Read full article: … Continue reading