UMass Medical School Creates First Division of Mindfulness

February 24th, 2018 - By jen in Uncategorized

As the bar for research on mind­ful­ness raises dramat­i­cally, a big change at the Univer­sity of Mass­a­chu­setts unites top-tier minds with increased resources to study meditation’s ther­a­peutic poten­tial. Read full article: mindful:healthy mind, healthy life, “UMass Medical School Creates First Divi­sion of Mind­ful­ness.”

Smartphone Detox: How To Power Down In A Wired World

February 16th, 2018 - By jen in Uncategorized

A growing number of doctors and psychol­o­gists are concerned about our rela­tion­ship with the phone. There’s a debate about what to call the problem. Some say “disorder” or “prob­lem­atic behavior.” Others think over-reliance on a smart­phone can become a behav­ioral addic­tion, like gambling. Read full article: npr, “Smart­phone Detox: How to Power Down In A Wired World.”

Learn How to Do Nothing With the Dutch Concept of Niksen

January 26th, 2018 - By jen in Anxiety, Neurofeedback News, Uncategorized

Instead of constantly occu­pying your mind with what you need to do next or bouncing from one task to another, niksen is the prac­tice of slowing it all down. As Mecking writes, it’s a welcome reprieve from soci­etal expec­ta­tions about work and produc­tivity that perme­ates the culture. Read full article: life­hacker, “Learn How to Do Nothing With the Dutch Concept of Niksen.”

Laptops Are Great. But Not During a Lecture or a Meeting.

January 4th, 2018 - By jen in Uncategorized

…college students learn less when they use computers or tablets during lectures. They also tend to earn worse grades. The research is unequiv­ocal: Laptops distract from learning, both for users and for those around them. It’s not much of a leap to expect that elec­tronics also under­mine learning in high school class­rooms or that they hurt produc­tivity in meet­ings in all kinds of work­places. Read … Continue reading

Why Aren’t We Talking About the Cognitive Health Crisis?

December 1st, 2017 - By jen in Uncategorized

Maybe more than any other disease, severe cogni­tive impair­ments have the poten­tial to unravel fami­lies. They’re not one and done. They drag on. They aren’t “lethal” in the normal sense. People with Alzheimer’s can lead long lives, the latter halves of which can get very diffi­cult for everyone involved. Read full article: Marks Daily Apple, “Why Aren’t We Talking About the Cogni­tive Health Crisis?”

How Not to Talk to Your Kids

September 5th, 2017 - By jen in Uncategorized

New York Univer­sity professor of psychi­atry Judith Brook explains that the issue for parents is one of cred­i­bility. “Praise is impor­tant, but not vacuous praise,” she says. “It has to be based on a real thing—some skill or talent they have.” Once chil­dren hear praise they inter­pret as merit­less, they discount not just the insin­cere praise, but sincere praise as well. Read full article: New … Continue reading

Learning to Learn: You, Too, Can Rewire Your Brain

August 10th, 2017 - By jen in Uncategorized

The studio for what is arguably the world’s most successful online course is tucked into a corner of Barb and Phil Oakley’s basement…This is where they put together “Learning How to Learn,” taken by more than 1.8 million students from 200 coun­tries, the most ever on Coursera. The course provides prac­tical advice on tack­ling daunting subjects and on beating procras­ti­na­tion, and the lessons engag­ingly blend … Continue reading

You Still Need Your Brain

May 22nd, 2017 - By jen in Uncategorized

Most adults recall memo­rizing the names of rivers or the Pythagorean theorem in school and wondering, “When am I ever gonna use this stuff?” Kids today have a high-profile spokesman. Jonathan Rochelle, the director of Google’s educa­tion apps group, said last year at an industry confer­ence that he “cannot answer” why his chil­dren should learn the quadratic equa­tion. He wonders why they cannot “ask Google.” … Continue reading

Learning to Think Like a Computer

April 27th, 2017 - By jen in Uncategorized

It’s obvious that computers have become indis­pens­able problem-solving part­ners, not to mention personal compan­ions. But it’s suddenly not enough to be a fluent user of soft­ware inter­faces. Under­standing what lies behind the computer’s seeming magic now seems crucial. In partic­ular, “compu­ta­tional thinking” is capti­vating educa­tors, from kinder­garten teachers to college profes­sors, offering a new language and orien­ta­tion to tackle prob­lems in other areas of life. … Continue reading

Training Your Brain So That You Don’t Need Reading Glasses

April 6th, 2017 - By jen in Uncategorized

By middle age, the lenses in your eyes harden, becoming less flex­ible. Your eye muscles increas­ingly struggle to bend them to focus on this print… But a new form of training — brain retraining, really — may delay the inevitable age-related loss of close-range visual focus so that you won’t need reading glasses. Read full article: The New York Times, “Training Your Brain So That … Continue reading