How to Become a ‘Superager’

January 16th, 2017 - By jen in Uncategorized

Think about the people in your life who are 65 or older. Some of them are expe­ri­encing the usual mental diffi­cul­ties of old age, like forget­ful­ness or a dwin­dling atten­tion span. Yet others somehow manage to remain mentally sharp. Read Full Article: The New York Times, “How to Become a ‘Super­ager’”

The Power of Concentration

January 9th, 2017 - By jen in Psychotherapy, Uncategorized

Though the concept orig­i­nates in ancient Buddhist, Hindu and Chinese tradi­tions, when it comes to exper­i­mental psychology, mind­ful­ness is less about spir­i­tu­ality and more about concen­tra­tion: the ability to quiet your mind, focus your atten­tion on the present, and dismiss any distrac­tions that come your way. Read Full Article: The New York Times, “The Power of Concen­tra­tion”

You’re an Adult. Your Brain, Not So Much.

January 3rd, 2017 - By jen in Uncategorized

The human brain reaches its adult volume by age 10, but the neurons that make it up continue to change for years after that. The connec­tions between neigh­boring neurons get pruned back, as new links emerge between more widely sepa­rated areas of the brain. Read Full Article: The New York Times, “You’re an Adult. Your Brain, Not So Much.”

Arianna Huffington on a Book About Working Less, Resting More

December 20th, 2016 - By jen in Uncategorized

Rest not only makes us more produc­tive and more creative, but also makes our lives “richer and more fulfilling.” But not all rest is created equal — it’s not just about not-working. The most produc­tive kind of rest, according to Pang, is also active and delib­erate. Read full article: The New York Times, “Arianna Huff­in­gton on a Book About Working Less, Resting More”

Mindful Eating as Food for Thought

December 19th, 2016 - By jen in Uncategorized

In the eyes of some experts, what seems like the simplest of acts — eating slowly and genuinely relishing each bite — could be the remedy for a fast-paced Paula Deen Nation in which an endless parade of new diets never seems to slow a stam­pede toward obesity. Read full article: The New York Times, “Mindful Eating as Food for Thought”

Beating Alzheimer’s With Brain Waves

December 7th, 2016 - By admin in Uncategorized

Researchers have shown the possi­bility of a completely new approach to dealing with Alzheimer’s—changing neural activity, rather than deliv­ering drugs or chem­i­cals. Read full article:The Atlantic, “Beating Alzheimer’s With Brain Waves”

When Tech Is a Problem Child

November 22nd, 2016 - By admin in Uncategorized

Just last month, the Amer­ican Academy of Pedi­atrics released a study that said while digital and social media can help early learning, they also come with a host of risks, including nega­tive effects on sleep, atten­tion and learning, along with higher inci­dence of obesity and depres­sion. Read full article: The New York Times, “When Tech Is a Problem Child”

The 4 Traits That Put Kids at Risk for Addiction

October 4th, 2016 - By admin in Uncategorized

A new antidrug program recog­nizes how a child’s tempera­ment drives his or her risk for drug use — and that different traits create different path­ways to addic­tion. Read full article: The New York Times, “The 4 Traits That Put Kids at Risk for Addic­tion”

Can Teenage Defiance Be Manipulated for Good?

September 16th, 2016 - By admin in Uncategorized

Since there have been teenagers, there have been adults trying to control them. This study recasts adoles­cent defi­ance for adults. It depicts teenage rebel­lion as a poten­tial asset to be culti­vated, rather than as a threat to be quashed. Read full article: The New York Times, “Can Teenage Defi­ance Be Manip­u­lated for Good?”