Yes, teens are texting and using social media instead of reading books, researchers say

August 27th, 2018 - By jen in Teens

A new study has alarming find­ings, but is prob­ably not surprising to anyone who knows a teenager: High-schoolers today are texting, scrolling and using social media instead of reading books and magazines…In their free time, Amer­ican adoles­cents are cradling their devices hours each day rather than losing them­selves in print or long-form media, according to research published Monday by the Amer­ican Psycho­log­ical Asso­ci­a­tion. Read full … Continue reading

I Learned I Have Sleep Apnea. It’s More Serious Than Many People Realize.

July 30th, 2018 - By jen in Sleep

Sleep apnea can be down­right deadly, and not just for those who have it. It’s asso­ci­ated with a greater risk of depres­sion, heart attacks, strokes and other cardio­vas­cular condi­tions, as well as insulin resis­tance. As I learned, there’s no reason to meekly accept sleep apnea: There are many treat­ment options that can control it. Read full article: The New York Times, “I Learned I Have … Continue reading

Cutting Edge’ Program For Children With Autism And ADHD Rests On Razor-Thin Evidence

July 17th, 2018 - By jen in Autism Spectrum, Information on ADD/ADHD

Brain Balance says its nonmed­ical and drug-free program helps chil­dren who struggle with ADHD, autism spec­trum disor­ders and learning and processing disor­ders. The company says it addresses a child’s chal­lenges with a combi­na­tion of phys­ical exer­cises, nutri­tional guid­ance and acad­emic training. An NPR inves­ti­ga­tion of Brain Balance reveals a company whose promises have resonated with parents averse to medica­tion. But Brain Balance also appears to … Continue reading

A Map That Shows You Everything Wrong With Your Brain

July 9th, 2018 - By jen in neuroAgility News, Neurofeedback News

Kerson placed the cap on my head and clipped two sensors on to my earlobes, areas of no elec­trical activity, to act as base­lines. As she began Elec­tro­gelling the 19 spots on my head that aligned with the cap’s elec­trodes, I was nervous in two different direc­tions: one, that my brain would be revealed as subop­timal, under­func­tioning, defi­cient. The other, that it would be fine, … Continue reading

Association of Food Allergy and Other Allergic Conditions With Autism Spectrum Disorder in Children

June 12th, 2018 - By jen in Autism Spectrum

Ques­tion  What are the asso­ci­a­tions of food allergy and other allergic condi­tions with autism spec­trum disorder (ASD) in chil­dren? Find­ings  This cross-sectional study used nation­ally repre­sen­ta­tive data from 199 520 chil­dren aged 3 to 17 years who partic­i­pated in the US National Health Inter­view Survey from 1997 to 2016. Chil­dren with food, respi­ra­tory, and skin aller­gies were signif­i­cantly more likely to have ASD than chil­dren without … Continue reading

Music Lessons Improve Children’s Cognitive Skills, Academic Performance

May 10th, 2018 - By jen in Athletic/Performance Enhancement, Uncategorized

Struc­tured music lessons signif­i­cantly enhance children’s cogni­tive abil­i­ties, including language-based reasoning, short-term memory, plan­ning and inhi­bi­tion, which lead to improved acad­emic perfor­mance. Published in Fron­tiers in Neuro­science, the research is the first large-scale, longi­tu­dinal study to be adapted into the regular school curriculum. Visual arts lessons were also found to signif­i­cantly improve children’s visual and spatial memory. Read full article: Labo­ra­tory Equip­ment, “Music Lessons Improve … Continue reading

Helping Kids With A.D.H.D., and Their Families, Thrive

April 26th, 2018 - By jen in Information on ADD/ADHD

When a child has atten­tion deficit hyper­ac­tivity disorder, it affects every­body in the family, said Dr. Mark Bertin, a devel­op­mental pedi­a­tri­cian in Pleas­antville, N.Y. Parents need to under­stand the nature of A.D.H.D., he said, and appre­ciate that it affects “a host of self-manage­­ment skills,” which play out in school but also in daily home routines. Read full article: The New York Times, “Helping Kids With … Continue reading

Why Teenagers Become ‘Allergic’ to Their Parents

April 19th, 2018 - By jen in Teens

The arrival of spring is often prime time for hay fever, but adoles­cents seem to be able to develop an allergy to their parents, either inter­mit­tent or chronic, at any time of the year. This allergy usually has a sudden onset around age 13 and can last for months or, in some cases, years. While it’s no fun to become the parent who cannot order … Continue reading

Want to enjoy the deep, mystical sleep of our ancestors? Turn your lights off at dusk.

March 8th, 2018 - By jen in neuroAgility News, Sleep

What if you could medi­tate like a Tibetan lama with no instruc­tion what­so­ever — and without having to subscribe to any reli­gious beliefs?  People hear a ques­tion like that and, unless they are partic­u­larly gullible, they assume they’re about to be scammed. But in this case there is nothing to buy — no tapes, no app, no reli­gious agenda that gets sprung on you at … Continue reading

Learn How to Do Nothing With the Dutch Concept of Niksen

January 26th, 2018 - By jen in Anxiety, Neurofeedback News, Uncategorized

Instead of constantly occu­pying your mind with what you need to do next or bouncing from one task to another, niksen is the prac­tice of slowing it all down. As Mecking writes, it’s a welcome reprieve from soci­etal expec­ta­tions about work and produc­tivity that perme­ates the culture. Read full article: life­hacker, “Learn How to Do Nothing With the Dutch Concept of Niksen.”