CU Boulder to lead Pac-12 research initiative on student-athlete concussions

November 17th, 2017 - By jen in Athletic/Performance Enhancement, Mild/Traumatic Brain Injury

The Pac-12 Confer­ence announced today that CU Boulder has been selected to lead its Student-Athlete Health and Well-Being Concus­sion Coor­di­nating Unit (PCCU), a multi-year, multi-site research initia­tive that will estab­lish best prac­tices and clin­ical infra­struc­ture for advancing educa­tion on trau­matic brain injury in student-athletes through the use of Sync­Think EYE-SYNC tech­nology, a world leader in neuro-tech­nology with foun­da­tional intel­lec­tual prop­erty in eye-tracking. Read full article: … Continue reading

How Not to Talk to Your Kids

September 5th, 2017 - By jen in Uncategorized

New York Univer­sity professor of psychi­atry Judith Brook explains that the issue for parents is one of cred­i­bility. “Praise is impor­tant, but not vacuous praise,” she says. “It has to be based on a real thing—some skill or talent they have.” Once chil­dren hear praise they inter­pret as merit­less, they discount not just the insin­cere praise, but sincere praise as well. Read full article: New … Continue reading

Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?

August 14th, 2017 - By jen in Teens

Around 2012, I noticed abrupt shifts in teen behav­iors and emotional states. The gentle slopes of the line graphs became steep moun­tains and sheer cliffs, and many of the distinc­tive char­ac­ter­is­tics of the Millen­nial gener­a­tion began to disap­pear. In all my analyses of gener­a­tional data—some reaching back to the 1930s—I had never seen anything like it. Read full article: The Atlantic, “Have Smart­phones Destroyed a … Continue reading

Learning to Learn: You, Too, Can Rewire Your Brain

August 10th, 2017 - By jen in Uncategorized

The studio for what is arguably the world’s most successful online course is tucked into a corner of Barb and Phil Oakley’s basement…This is where they put together “Learning How to Learn,” taken by more than 1.8 million students from 200 coun­tries, the most ever on Coursera. The course provides prac­tical advice on tack­ling daunting subjects and on beating procras­ti­na­tion, and the lessons engag­ingly blend … Continue reading

No, Your Teen Doesn’t Hate You. It’s Just Summer.

June 27th, 2017 - By jen in Teens

As summer gets underway, teenagers may be home more often, but that doesn’t neces­sarily mean you’ll see more of them. If they retreat to their rooms for hours or seem cagey about their plans, don’t take it person­ally. Following are four truths about teens that may help you and your adoles­cent coexist. Read full article: The New York Times, “No, Your Teen Doesn’t Hate You. … Continue reading

More than a third of teenage girls experience depression, new study says

June 13th, 2017 - By jen in Psychotherapy, Teens

A large new study out this week contains some alarming data about the state of children’s mental health in the United States, finding that depres­sion in many chil­dren appears to start as early as age 11. By the time they hit age 17, the analysis found, 13.6 percent of boys and a stag­gering 36.1 percent of girls have been or are depressed. Read full article: The Wash­ington Post, “More … Continue reading

You Still Need Your Brain

May 22nd, 2017 - By jen in Uncategorized

Most adults recall memo­rizing the names of rivers or the Pythagorean theorem in school and wondering, “When am I ever gonna use this stuff?” Kids today have a high-profile spokesman. Jonathan Rochelle, the director of Google’s educa­tion apps group, said last year at an industry confer­ence that he “cannot answer” why his chil­dren should learn the quadratic equa­tion. He wonders why they cannot “ask Google.” … Continue reading

Learning to Think Like a Computer

April 27th, 2017 - By jen in Uncategorized

It’s obvious that computers have become indis­pens­able problem-solving part­ners, not to mention personal compan­ions. But it’s suddenly not enough to be a fluent user of soft­ware inter­faces. Under­standing what lies behind the computer’s seeming magic now seems crucial. In partic­ular, “compu­ta­tional thinking” is capti­vating educa­tors, from kinder­garten teachers to college profes­sors, offering a new language and orien­ta­tion to tackle prob­lems in other areas of life. … Continue reading

When I Was Your Age’ And Other Pitfalls Of Talking To Teens About Stress

April 27th, 2017 - By jen in Teens

It’s diffi­cult to have a teenager’s mind. The brain develops rapidly during the adoles­cent years, which partially explains why teens expe­ri­ence anger, sadness and frus­tra­tion so intensely… During these tumul­tuous years, hormones surge, bodies change and adoles­cents must face a number of social and acad­emic chal­lenges, such as managing their rela­tion­ships, coping with peer rejec­tion and,— espe­cially this time of year — grad­u­ating from high … Continue reading